Author Archives: blake

Tent and Rest

test

It is common knowledge that it is a good idea to let meat rest before carving to allow the juices to reincorporate back into the meat.  However, by tenting with foil on the Concave Board, you can add another organic level of flavor.  While the meat rests, it lets off steam, which collects on the inside of the foil as condensation. These beads of goodness then drip back onto the meat, basting it and rolling down onto the board to mix with the collected juices.

Reunite

reunited

This technique is great in any labor-intensive cut of meat that has a tendency to dry out in the cooking process ( brisket, turkey, pork loin…)  After cooking, save the renderings and strain with a fat separator.  We recommend adding back in just a little fat.  Place the protein onto the Concave Board and pour the strained renderings back over the top while it rests, adding additional herbs and/or melted butter to amplify the flavor.

Add Flavor

painted-dumpiton

Not everything has to be complicated.  Instead of making your own board dressing, grab your favorite bottle off the shelf and paint the board or dump it over the protein while it is resting on the Concave Board. 

Examples: 

  • Pulled pork: Dump BBQ sauce on the board while you chop or pull your pork.
  • Chicken wings: Shake some extra dry-rub on the board and toss the wings in the rub as they rest.
  • Steak: Paint the board with your favorite steak sauce, add the steaks, and bring the concave board to the table for a rustic, family-style presentation.

Dress the Board

carve-oil-and-herbs

Board dressings are a simple, fresh way to add another layer of flavor to any dish. Simply chop 2 Tbsp of any combination of fresh herbs on the concave board, then add 2 Tbsp each oil and melted butter. Chop in to mix well. Just before the protein finishes cooking, add salt and pepper to the board dressing.  Place cooked protein on the board, turning to coat. Loosely tent with aluminum foil while resting.

Concave: For the Chef

I have never received a standing ovation in one of my cooking classes until the “Steak Night” class I did using a Concave cutting board.  I had made my own rub and had grilled to steaks to a beautiful med rare.  I then put the steaks on my Concave board to rest and poured a butter and herb mixture over the steaks.  The people in the class were now very engaged.  I tented the steaks and prepared another part of the meal.  I then carved the steaks and gave out small samples of this delicious beef that I dredged through the flavor pool.  It was then that I received the ovation.  The steaks were very good but I have to say that my Concave board contributed mightily to the success of the evening.  I will never cook a steak any other way!

Stephen Harman, Charleston, SC